Post-Racism America

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Since the 1800s, when America became the dream destination for hordes of international immigrants, America has been considered a melting pot. With all these different people with different nationalities living so close to each other, there’s bound to be tension. Worse than the natural tension created by the immigrants, was the divisions created by slavery. People brought slaves to America to help with the costs of such large plantations. The right to own a person as property became a huge dividing line across America and led to the Civil War, which was a devastating and high-casualty war (since both sides were Americans). The war pitted brother against brother and ripped families apart.

Even after the war was over, however, things were far from equal, especially in the South. Southern politicians created laws that they called “separate but equal.” Facilities were far from equal though. More often than not, the white facility was new and worked perfectly, while the black one was run-down, old and broken. African Americans have fought for years for equal rights, and in the 1960’s they made huge progress when the Equal Rights Amendment was signed into law.

I think it is possible for America to become post-racial. Certainly it is going to take some time, but the strides made in the last hundred years, and especially the last fifty years have been quite large. In the last fifty years, African Americans have gone from having to pay a poll tax simply to vote, to having an African American as President of the United States.

The invention of the internet changed many things for many people. It is a place where people can post whatever they want, and in some cases, under whatever name they want. Some people choose to write anonymously in order to escape any scathing responses. Some people feel more comfortable freely speaking or writing what’s on their mind when they know there will be no repercussions or excessive criticism on what they have to say. They will be more open if they know they are safe and the writing can’t be traced back to them. The ability to blog or write anonymously can be considered a good thing because people can cross racial boundaries and freely say what is on their mind. Race can be defined as two things, how one perceives others and how one identifies themselves. If people have pre-conceived ideas about an article because of the author’s race, they will have a biased opinion before they even begin reading. Another positive of writing anonymously is that the writer, if they are fearful to speak of certain racial relations, can now freely say whatever they feel.

The negative aspect of writing anonymously is that the reader can feel uncomfortable and question the validity of the source. Todd Mintz, an online blogger feels this way. He believes people should own up to what they say and be held accountable for what they are writing: “Blogging anonymously is like playing a video game in “God Mode.” It’s blogging without risk or consequences. Without accountability, the anonymous blogger can present whatever version of the truth he/she wishes without risk.” 

President Obama speaks about a post-racism America in this video:

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One comment

  1. I agree with what you said about America possibly becoming post-racial. It will definitely take some time but at the rate the country is progressing it will eventually get there. It is quite significant, as you pointed out, that we now have an African-American president when not too long ago, African-Americans had to pay a tax to vote. Here is an interesting article about this: https://www.diversityinc.com/news/race-in-america-views-on-racial-disparities-50-years-later/

    While I agree with you that the Internet has opened many doors for people to express their opinions about race, I feel as though it has also had harmful effects. If people can spread racial tolerance, then the price of that is to allow people to spread racial ignorance.

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